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October 10, 2010 / zzirf

I love being validated on 10/10/10

If there is one thing I hate, it is being told that I need more exercise. Sure I’d be less overweight but then I would also be in even more pain if I exercised beyond that which I already do. Sometimes I feel guilty that I do not do enough but I think I should learn to trust my own judgment after all these decades of experimenting with energy. I have lost count of the times that I have jeopardized my own quality of life by accidentally over doing it when I feel fine enough to be active for a whole day. It is hard not to overdo it when everything suddenly becomes easy again. Those days are few and far between but they are what keeps me hoping for more days rather than totally giving up on ever feeling exhilarated again. There is no doubt about the fact that if the energy is there, we want to use it and we are not the malingerers we have been made out to be. We have also learned to pace ourselves on the days when we are less than energetic. It is easier then because that veil of woe is obviously cloudy. It feels cloudy –  then there is the pain. No-one likes to aggravate pain so you become more protective of yourself for sure and sensibly so. That does not mean that you will not move a body part to relieve pain because that too can help with some types of pain. I can loosen up a sore lumbar region with a walk but I can also bring on what feels like a flu-like illness, the next day. We have to learn to pick our priorities and it is damned hard especially when others add their opinions into the mix and do not understand that any movement is “exercise” for us.

Anyway, here is the quote that feels like a validation of my own discovery which has come as a result of living with CFS/ME and fibromyalgia and an irritable bowel.

“In a survey by the MEA of more than 2,000 patients, more than 70 per cent reported a greatly improved or improved result when using the Management of Energy approach called pacing. The aim of pacing is to remain as active as possible, but to avoid the relapses resulting from overexertion. Effectively, this means stopping an activity when patients feel they have reached that point where pleasant tiredness becomes unpleasant, where arms or legs begin to feel weak, or where they start to feel unwell or sick. The key, for them, is to listen to their body to ensure they do not make their condition worse than their pre-exercise state.”♥

The only problem with the approach is that the effects of exercise or should I say “movement” are often delayed till the following day so it is hard to know when to stop.  It is just like eating a meal in less than 20 minutes before your brain has even registered your level of satiation.  I am sure you have had the experience where you have overeaten accidentally because you did not get that “three-quarters full” feeling in time.  Consequently we are taught to eat meals slowly if we have been taught well and in harmony with our bodies.  For people with FM or CFS, it is the same with movement and you may not get your warning signs in time to take the hint.

I cannot remember when I have had the same amount of stamina as my peers and I grew up feeling very inferior because I really valued muscular strength.  I think society taught me to value it.  “My” society did value it.

♥Reference:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthadvice/lifecoach/8032394/LifeCoach-coping-with-M-E.html

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2 Comments

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  1. hiddenlives / Oct 13 2010 4:53 PM

    Very well said! Thank you also for posting the quote you used as all of us can use a little validation 🙂 That you point out that we often don’t know until later that we’ve pushed past that point of helpful to exacerbating, is a very important addendum to the quote.

    Thanks for this!

    • zzirf / Nov 19 2010 12:05 AM

      Thank you for my very first comment, I only just saw the reply link pop up for the first time today so sorry for the delay in expressing my joy at being heard. 🙂

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